Seduction at its finest.

February 3, 2011 § Leave a comment

Quentin Tarantino makes some of the most iconic movies in our culture. Recently he won the first ever Music + Film award for his brilliant combinations of music and picture. And not just in a music video way but in a cinematic way. There are certain songs that, if you’ve seen the movie, you think specifically of Quentin Tarantino. One song in particular, at least for me, is “Son of a Preacher Man” by Dusty Springfield. Take a look at how Tarantino uses it in Pulp Fiction.

A scene of complete seduction – Uma Thurman’s voice over the intercom, the slowly articulated “disco!” that she utters when John Travolta approaches the intercom – it’s unusual that Tarantino would choose this song. But how perfect is it? Completely adds to the entire feel of the scene in a way that no other song could.

Quentin Tarantino has paved a way for music’s place in cinema and has inspired many other directors’ song choices. I was watching the French film Heartbreakers yesterday (a great light hearted comedy, a few cheesy moments, but fun to watch a romantic comedy in another language). One of the opening scenes – a young, handsome man sitting in the pool lusting over the well tanned slim babe in a black bikini exit the pool in slow-mo. What song is in the background? That’s right – “Son of a Preacher Man” (in English of course). Fantastic to see Quentin Tarantino’s inspiration all over cinematic scene.

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